The modern use of the phrase "new world order," originated in the early 1900s with Cecil Rhodes, who advocated that the British Empire and the United States should jointly impose a Federal World Government (with English as the official language) to bring about lasting world "peace".[6] A sinister motive is seen in the fact that Rhodes founded the Rhodes Scholarship as a global brotherhood of future leaders. Lionel Curtis, who also believed in this idea, founded the Round Table movement in 1909, which led to the establishment of the British-based Royal Institute for International Affairs in 1919 and the U.S.-based Council on Foreign Relations in 1921.[7] The concept was further developed by Edward M. House, a close advisor to Woodrow Wilson during the negotiations to set up the League of Nations (it is unclear whether it was House or Wilson who invented the actual phrase). Another important influence was the author H.G. Wells, a vigorous advocate for world government.[8]

One official mention which has garnered attention was in Gerald Ford's "Declaration of Interdependence" on 24 October 1975; according to the ex-general counsel of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, Peter Beter, the Declaration of Interdependence states that:

"We must join with others to bring forth a new world order....Narrow notions of national sovereignty must not be permitted to curtail that obligation."[9]

Elements are present in the populism of the nineteenth century. In present form this can be traced to the collapse of the Soviet Union and President George H. W. Bush's new world order speech of 11 September 1990. In it he described the United States' objectives for post-cold-war cooperation with the former Soviet Union, using the phrase "new world order".[10]

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